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Littleton Divorce Law Blog

What is the best thing you can do for a child after divorce?

You and your spouse have two children under five years old. As you move toward divorce, you worry about the potential impact for the kids. How will it make them feel? How will they adjust?

You do not worry so much about losing the relationship yourself. You can deal with that. You just do not want the kids to suffer.

Drafting a parenting schedule in Colorado

One of the key ways to have a successful relationship with the other parent of your children after you have separated is through a parenting plan. It is likely that you and your ex do not see eye to eye on all arrangements concerning your children. If you share custody, there might be minor disputes regarding who will pick up your child from soccer practice, who should help them with homework, and where they should stay on weeknights versus weekends.

While all of these minor conflicts are normal and natural in a coparent relationship, they can be successfully solved through the creation of a robust parenting plan.

There are steps you can take to prevent a contest to your will

If you've spent your life building up valuable assets, you probably have strong opinions about what happens to them after you die. After all, bequeathing those assets to loved ones, family and even charitable organizations can be a way to build a lasting legacy after you pass on. Unfortunately, even if you take the time to carefully plan your estate and create a last will, your family members and heirs can challenge your plan and drag your estate through probate court.

There's no reason why you simply have to accept that a will challenge could change your legacy. If you have reason to believe that your heirs or family members may fight over your assets or disagree with the terms of your will, you can take steps now to reduce that risk.

How do the Colorado courts handle your home during divorce?

For many couples, their family home is the single biggest asset they've invested in over their adult lives. As much as a third of your monthly income may go directly to a mortgage payment. Even more may get spent to upgrade and beautify your living space. It's only natural, then, to worry about what will happen to it in a divorce. Educating and informing yourself about Colorado divorces can make your divorce easier on everyone involved.

Despite what you may have heard from other people, there's no absolute means of predicting how the courts will rule in a divorce. Colorado is a marital property state, meaning that the courts seek to fairly divide your marital assets between both spouses in a divorce. Generally speaking, that will include the home you purchased with your spouse.

Signs that it's time to contest the administration of an estate

When a loved one dies, the last thing you want to do is focus on money and possessions. Grieving the loss of a family member or spouse may even prevent you from handling practical matters, like bills and other financial concerns. However, over time, you may notice that something simply isn't right as far as the administration of the estate.

For many people, a carefully crafted estate plan is their final legacy, a way to give back to their loved ones, closest friends and even charities. When you believe that the person charged with handling the estate has failed to uphold the responsibilities of the position or if there's cause to worry about undue influence on the final estate plan, it may be time to consider contesting the estate.

Worried your spouse is hiding assets during your divorce?

Divorce can often bring out the worst in people. Emotions run high, and otherwise law-abiding, decent people can become angry and aggressive. In some cases, both spouses feel desperate to "win" the divorce by seeking full custody of the children or more assets when the property gets split up by the courts. This urge can lead some people to try to hide assets immediately prior to or during a divorce.

The higher your overall marital assets, the greater the potential motivation for your spouse to try to hide some of those assets from you and the courts during the divorce. After all, if certain assets don't get reported to the courts, the courts won't be able to divide them between you both. If you suspect hidden assets, you need to inform your attorney and take action as soon as possible.

Don’t leave things to chance - start estate planning now

Drafting a will is a task you should tackle sooner rather than later. While we all hope to live to a ripe old age, the reality is that none of us know what tomorrow will bring. In a split second, your entire life can change or even come to an end. If you do not already have a will in place, it is vital that you take steps as soon as possible to remedy the situation.

If you are considering drafting a will or doing any other estate planning, you probably have some questions. While your estate planning attorney will be a great source of information, there are numerous resources available to point you in the right direction.

You can make your divorce easier with these tips

There is no way around it, divorce is hard. It takes both an emotional toll and a physical one. Between dividing up marital property, such as your home in Littleton, and working out a parenting plan for the kids, it may seem like you are facing one battle after another. In addition, you also have to deal with starting over while knowing that he is, too.

While it is up to you to make certain decisions and deal with a whole range of emotions, there are things you can do to make the process easier.

Protecting your privacy during a high-asset divorce

When you and your spouse realize that it's time for a divorce, the process is always difficult to navigate. Even in the best circumstances, divorce is an emotional matter, and often draws the interest of your personal and professional community. This is especially true if your divorce is particularly complex.

The more complicated the assets involved in a divorce, the more crucial some privacy can be in a divorce, especially when the way the divorce plays out may affect many individuals. Fortunately, there are some ways to protect your privacy during a high-asset divorce, but it's important to understand your specific goals as you enter the divorce process.

Estate planning can protect your legacy

If you are in your twenties or even early thirties, you may think you are far from a place where you need to start estate planning. The reality is that estate planning is not just for people over 50 or those who are in the financial one percent. The earlier you start the process, the easier it will be for you to make adjustments as your wealth builds.

By having a solid estate plan in place, not only will you feel more secure about your legacy, but your heirs will thank you for it. A good estate plan will address issues such as how your executor or estate administrator will divide your assets among your beneficiaries and mitigate the tax consequences that sometimes come with inherited property. Read further to find out more about estate planning strategies that can help you protect your legacy.

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